Crossroads: How the Blues Shaped Rock ‘n’ Roll (and Rock Saved the Blues)





[vcmamazon asin=”1555537448″]
[vcmamazon asin=”B00CLWRQ4I”]

Published by

Claude Corry

Being a musician from a young age I began singing at the age of five. I have been a live performer for about thirty years and have played in many bands from covers bands to original ensembles. At twenty I began to write a lot of my own songs and still do today and have written about two hundred works.

6 thoughts on “Crossroads: How the Blues Shaped Rock ‘n’ Roll (and Rock Saved the Blues)”

  1. 5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    An essential title in blues literature, June 20, 2013
    By 
    Mystery Fan (Elmhurst, IL) –

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Crossroads: How the Blues Shaped Rock ‘n’ Roll (and Rock Saved the Blues) (Hardcover)

    This is an essential title for anyone’s blues library. There has been various books and articles over the years that have treated the nexus of the blues world of African Americans with the music world of mainstream or white society, from a folk angle, from a rock angle, from a British angle, and from a countercultural angle. This book by rock writer and critic John Milward brings all these angles together in one tightly and elegantly written book. Given Milward’s rock background he spends considerable more time than would be expected on the rediscovery of the prewar country blues artists and their musical reentrance into the folk music scene. I was unfamiliar with the Bohemian Greenwich Village scene and was thoroughly enlightened in that regard. Much of his take on all the connections between the huge rock scene and blues artists relating to performances, recordings, and music techniques I was familiar with, but much was new to me. I did not follow Stevie Ray Vaughn’s career, for example. Milward, a musician himself, is particularly good on explaining how blues artists’ open tuning informed the music of Keith Richards. Chicago residents like me will particularly relate to Milward’s discussions on the Chicago scene, where he discusses Big John’s, the first north side club to book south and west side blues artists, such as Junior Wells, Little Walter, Jimmy Cotton, Howlin’ Wolf, and Muddy Waters, and where the nexus with white blues artists came about with such bands as Goldberg-Miller Band, Paul Butterfield, and Corky Siegel.

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No

  2. 1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    If you love Blues or Rock, you will love this book!, July 21, 2013
    By 
    Car Crazzee (Los Angeles, CA.) –

    This review is from: Crossroads: How the Blues Shaped Rock ‘n’ Roll (and Rock Saved the Blues) (Hardcover)

    From the early interest of record collectors to a generation of folkies and blues fans who actually went out
    in search of their heroes and onward into how rock became entrenched in the blues, this is a must have for fans of both genres.
    If you thought you knew it all in terms of how this cross fertilization occured, Milward shines an interesting light on the
    incredible role blues played in the emergence of rock through the 1960’s, 70’s and 80’s culminating wth Stevie Ray Vaughn, the last
    artist two effectively merge the two genres.
    Well researched and written, “Crossroads” is a book that will reveal many new facts from the massive amount of research Milward
    unearthed to tell this fascinating story.

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No

  3. 3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    An extraordinary achievement, August 3, 2013
    By 
    Paul S. Jellinek (New Jersey) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: Crossroads: How the Blues Shaped Rock ‘n’ Roll (and Rock Saved the Blues) (Hardcover)

    What a book! For anyone who loves the blues and/or rock and/or American music, this is THE book to read (and believe me, I’ve read a lot of them over the years, on both sides of the equation). What above all makes this book such an extraordinary achievement is the compellingly vivid way that author John Milward, like a modern day Dickens or Balzac, manages to bring such a staggering array of thoroughly human characters to life (with a strong assist from the striking woodcut illustrations by Milward’s wife Margie Greve). They practically jump out of the page at you–everyone from Son House and Skip James and Mississippi John Hurt and Robert Johnson and Reverend Gary Davis to Muddy Waters and Howling Wolf and BB King and Eric Clapton and Peter Green and Buddy Guy and Michael Bloomfield and Jimi Hendrix and Keith Richards and John Lee Hooker and Bob Dylan and the Allman Brothers and the Vaughan brothers and… you get the drift. At first, it’s all a little overwhelming–so many amazing stories about so many amazing people–until suddenly the light goes on and you begin to see how their lives and their pain and their music are in fact intimately intertwined and interwoven with one another, creating the vast living tapestry of American music that has enriched (and continues to enrich) our lives in so many ways. The acid test for me whenever I’m reading a book about music is whether I’m sufficiently motivated by what I’m reading to get up from my chair and actually put on the damn CD and listen to it. Well, in this case, I couldn’t stop. I kept getting up and putting on the CD’s, often hearing them with a whole new set of ears because of what I had just read. It is obvious that Milward has a deep and abiding love for this music, and that love for the music, and for the musicians who made it, is what makes this the best book of its kind that you’ll ever read.

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No

  4. 5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    An essential title in blues literature, June 20, 2013
    By 
    Mystery Fan (Elmhurst, IL) –

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)

    This is an essential title for anyone’s blues library. There has been various books and articles over the years that have treated the nexus of the blues world of African Americans with the music world of mainstream or white society, from a folk angle, from a rock angle, from a British angle, and from a countercultural angle. This book by rock writer and critic John Milward brings all these angles together in one tightly and elegantly written book. Given Milward’s rock background he spends considerable more time than would be expected on the rediscovery of the prewar country blues artists and their musical reentrance into the folk music scene. I was unfamiliar with the Bohemian Greenwich Village scene and was thoroughly enlightened in that regard. Much of his take on all the connections between the huge rock scene and blues artists relating to performances, recordings, and music techniques I was familiar with, but much was new to me. I did not follow Stevie Ray Vaughn’s career, for example. Milward, a musician himself, is particularly good on explaining how blues artists’ open tuning informed the music of Keith Richards. Chicago residents like me will particularly relate to Milward’s discussions on the Chicago scene, where he discusses Big John’s, the first north side club to book south and west side blues artists, such as Junior Wells, Little Walter, Jimmy Cotton, Howlin’ Wolf, and Muddy Waters, and where the nexus with white blues artists came about with such bands as Goldberg-Miller Band, Paul Butterfield, and Corky Siegel.

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No

  5. 1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    If you love Blues or Rock, you will love this book!, July 21, 2013
    By 
    Car Crazzee (Los Angeles, CA.) –

    From the early interest of record collectors to a generation of folkies and blues fans who actually went out
    in search of their heroes and onward into how rock became entrenched in the blues, this is a must have for fans of both genres.
    If you thought you knew it all in terms of how this cross fertilization occured, Milward shines an interesting light on the
    incredible role blues played in the emergence of rock through the 1960’s, 70’s and 80’s culminating wth Stevie Ray Vaughn, the last
    artist two effectively merge the two genres.
    Well researched and written, “Crossroads” is a book that will reveal many new facts from the massive amount of research Milward
    unearthed to tell this fascinating story.

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No

  6. 3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    An extraordinary achievement, August 3, 2013
    By 
    Paul S. Jellinek (New Jersey) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    What a book! For anyone who loves the blues and/or rock and/or American music, this is THE book to read (and believe me, I’ve read a lot of them over the years, on both sides of the equation). What above all makes this book such an extraordinary achievement is the compellingly vivid way that author John Milward, like a modern day Dickens or Balzac, manages to bring such a staggering array of thoroughly human characters to life (with a strong assist from the striking woodcut illustrations by Milward’s wife Margie Greve). They practically jump out of the page at you–everyone from Son House and Skip James and Mississippi John Hurt and Robert Johnson and Reverend Gary Davis to Muddy Waters and Howling Wolf and BB King and Eric Clapton and Peter Green and Buddy Guy and Michael Bloomfield and Jimi Hendrix and Keith Richards and John Lee Hooker and Bob Dylan and the Allman Brothers and the Vaughan brothers and… you get the drift. At first, it’s all a little overwhelming–so many amazing stories about so many amazing people–until suddenly the light goes on and you begin to see how their lives and their pain and their music are in fact intimately intertwined and interwoven with one another, creating the vast living tapestry of American music that has enriched (and continues to enrich) our lives in so many ways. The acid test for me whenever I’m reading a book about music is whether I’m sufficiently motivated by what I’m reading to get up from my chair and actually put on the damn CD and listen to it. Well, in this case, I couldn’t stop. I kept getting up and putting on the CD’s, often hearing them with a whole new set of ears because of what I had just read. It is obvious that Milward has a deep and abiding love for this music, and that love for the music, and for the musicians who made it, is what makes this the best book of its kind that you’ll ever read.

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No

Comments are closed.